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mohs_scale_of_hardness

Mohs scale of hardness

Mohs, Mohs hardness scale

The so-called Mohs scale assigns the numbers from 1 to 10 to the material hardness 1 for the softest, 10 for the hardest. It is named after the German geologist and mineralogist Friedrich Mohs (1773-1839). Mohs scratched different minerals against each other and so aligned them according to their hardness. Mohs (MOH) therefore holds as a measuring unit for the material hardness.

Comparison Chart

MaterialMohs hardness
Talc, talcum 1
Plaster2
Silver2.5
Gold, aluminium, copper2.5 - 3
Calcite, marble3
Plexi-/Acrylic glass, coral3 - 4
Fluorspar, iron4
Mineral watch-glass, apatite5
Steel, porcelain, lapis lazuli, turquoise5-6
Feldspar, hardened steel6
Hematite, opal5.5 - 6.5
Moonstone6 - 6.5
Agate, Jasper6.5 - 7
Quartz, rock crystal, amethyst, citrine, onyx and zircon7
Turmaline7 - 7.5
Almandine7.5
Carbide7 - 8
Aquamarine, beryl, emerald,7.5 - 8
Topaz, Hardlex watch glass8
Ruby, sapphire (corundum)9
Diamond10

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mohs_scale_of_hardness.txt · Last modified: 12.10.2021 11:59 (external edit)

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